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remember the united states as a country that helped or a country that did not help? definitely afghanistan will remember the united states as a country that helped. definitely afghanistan will remember that it was the u.s. assistance that brought so much to afghanistan. who will forget the less pleasant aspect ours relationship and we will move forward in the gratitude of the help that the united states has provided to afghanistan and also our other neighbors. but from today as we move forward will this relationship be a emotional as it was at time as you have heard in the past many years? will this relationship billion more mature? this relationship has already grown mature. we recognize the united states interest and afghanistan and the region and the united states recognizes that afghanistan is a good country. and has a life of its own. it has a law of its own and has a social context of its own. in that social context afghanistan will move forward in partnership with america and also until partnership with the other countries of nato that have helped us in the past many years. will afg
themes from our new book, "going to tehran: why the united states must come to terms with the islamic republic of iran". the first of these means, and these two get at the heart of our book. the united states is today enhanced and for the past two years a power and relative decline in the middle east. the second core team as the biggest beneficiary of american ongoing decline in the middle east is the islamic republic of iran. if you're not sure you agree with these propositions, i want to ask you to compare the relative position of the united states and the islamic republic of a rant in middle east today with where they were on the eve of 9/11 over 10 years ago. on the eve of 9/11, every single government in the middle east with either pro-american government egypt and turkey in negotiation effectively to become pro-american but government. in libya are anti-iranian like saddam hussein's government in iraq. every single government in the middle east is either pro-americans in negotiations to become pro-american or anti-iranian. it pretty good position for the 90s dates in the middle
is in fact what happens. this was a chronology and when the united states government announced a large-scale resettlement of iraqis in 2007, we immediately looked at what we should be doing in light of this particular population which was different, in nationality we had not been resettling a great deal. we looked at enhancements which could bring on board that would address this new population and that's when we created the partnership with d.o. de. later >> was this in 2007? >> will yes, later when we identified a new partnership with the counter-terrorism center, that was initially focused on iraqi applicants but we learned by doing and we learned about the heightened level of checks and then we expanded to applicants of all nationalities. we use the iraqi program to raise the bar across the board for other nationalities. >> there were some 25,000 per year for a few years, isn't that right? >> i believe the high point was 18,000 ballots did you have the resources to do some kind of fairly thorough assessment of each of those 18,000 before they were able to be granted -- >> yes, sir,
'm going to start with two provocative themes from our new book, "going to tehran: why the united states must come to terms with the islam you can republic of iran." the first of these themes, and these two really get at the heart of our book. the first of these themes is that the united states is today and has been for the past few years a power in relative decline in the middle east. and the second core theme is that the biggest beneficiary of america's ongoing decline in the middle east is the islamic republic of iran. if you're not sure you agree with these propositions, i want to ask you to compare the relative positions of the united states and the islamic republic of iran in the middle east today with where they were on the eve of 9/11, just over ten years ago. on the eve of 9/11, every single government in the middle east was either pro-american, like the governments in egypt and turkey, in negotiations effectively to become pro-american, like the governments in syria and libya, or anti-iranian like the taliban government in afghanistan and saddam hussein's government in iraq. ev
in the pledge. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the speaker: the chair will entertain one-minute speeches at a later time today. pursuant to section 5-a of house resolution 5, the chair now recognizes the gentleman from virginia, mr. goodlatte, for the reading of the constitution. mr. goodlatte: thank you, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, this morning for only the second time in the history of the house of representatives, we will read allowed the full text of the constitution of the united states. we hope this reading will inspire many more americans to read the constitution. we also hope that this reading will help demonstrate to the american people that the house of representatives is dedicated to the constitution and the system it establishes for limited government and the protection of individual liberty. the text we are reading today reflects the changes to the document made by the 27 amendments to it. those portions superseded by amendment will not be r
on the united states by mexico so i thought at the time as a youngster only i had not moral courage enough to resign." grant, of course, in the war was a young lieutenant, and i found this is really moving quote, and that's why it's the title. the fact of the matter is grant was not alone in thinking that the u.s. invasion of mexico was somehow wicked. one thing that i talked about in the book and i'll talk about tonight is the evolution of the american public in the course of the u.s.-mexico war, not a long war by any means from being really enthuse yays tix and in favor of invading mexico to largely turning in the war, and i see the u.s. mexico war as the moment of america's first anti-war movement actually coming into being so there was anti-war sentiments during the revolution and certainly in the war of 1812, but that sentiment was limited. what you see happening in 1847 is a consensus, really, across the board. people from different regions of the country, soldiers in the field, officers, politicians, all deciding that a war that was being more or less successfully waged in another c
the government will treat them as badly as the united states treats them or worse. there are still a few prisoners in guantanamo, the weakest from china, the chinese government. there are some in guantanamo cleared for release. and still held. i don't actually understand why they are still held. they were under the dictator ben all the who has been disposed. one issue needs to be looked at this why specific people are held, and one that many of us have been campaigning on for many years is the last british resident in guantanamo and the united states government has clearly said they want to release him. he is on a list of 65 who need to be released in september but the first time the united states government said the names and identities of 65 of these agencies. we have it printed, the united states government -- we have from the british government the statements over the years they want to be reunited for four british children and those of us who have been studying this thing is is because he knows too much. use a very eloquent man and fight for the rights of prisoners and knows the sto
in a way that the provisions that we arrive at through talks, will give the united states the satisfaction of what it seeks and will also provide the afghan people the benefit that they are seeking through this partnership and the subsequent agreement. that's not for us to decide. it's an issue for the united states. numbers are not going to make a difference to the situation in afghanistan. it's the broader relationship that will make a difference to afghanistan and beyond in the region. the specifics of numbers are issues that the military will decide and afghanistan will have no particular concern. when we're talking of numbers and how they are calculated. afghan interests. >>. >> translator: the government of afghanistan i would like to ask the question in my own language. mr. president, combative mission united states after 2014, how this mission will be, how will it be resembling, resembling the same mission as it was during 11 years? or is there a difference? different kind of mission. those who are in pakistan, particularly the safe havens that are in pakistan, wha
and gentlemen, the journey we began together in 2001, that is afghanistan and the united states. it was for a great cause. freeing civilians from terrorism and radicalism, little bitter rating afghanistan -- liberating afghanistan from an invasion and a rule by the taliban. the first one, in reverse order, the first one freeing afghanistan happened within a month and a half to two months. subbing squect of that afghanistan began its journey towards democracy, the rule of law, progress in all aspects of life. it went all right. it went reasonablely good under the circumstances. without a doubt with the help of the united states and our other allies around the world. the second part, freeing us all from terrorism and radicalism, didn't work as swiftly as we expected. there was bumps along the road and setbacks. now, the afghan people regardless where they stand recognize that afghanistan could not have made the progress that we have made in the past 10 years without the help we received from our allies. led by the united states of america. in more cruder terms the u.s. taxpayer's
, but i was interested in, i think, the real question is what kind of a iraq did the united states leave behind after sacrifice of 145 american lives lost, temperatures of thousands wounded, and hundreds of millions of dollars spent. what was the american policy towards iraq, and what's iraq look like today? that was the question i sought to address, but i covered the entire scope of the war. >> a year op, or, i guess, in december 2011, what had we achieved, and a year on, have we achieved that? >> well, by the time of -- by december 2011, there was a number of elections in iraq which was to the good, but iraq had not fully become a democracy in the sense there was not a peaceful transfer of power from the current regime led to another prime minister. that's a true test of a democracy is whether there's not merely an election, and russia has elections, i serve there, but whether there's an election, another candidate wins, and power is handed over to that candidate. iraq is in the at that milestone yet. what we had in december 2011 was a relatively stable iraq, a lot of hopes, but, i thi
status and resettlement in the united states. while the motivation behind creating these special immigrant categories were well intentioned, the fact remains that in may 2011, two iraqi nationals who were given refugee status and resettled in the u.s. were arrested and accused by the fbi of plotting to send weapons and money to al qaeda in iraq. one of the men arrested had openly discussed his prior experience as an insurgent in iraq and the ied attacks he participated against u.s. troops. the fingerprints of the other iraqi refugee charged were traced by the fbi to a component of an unexploded ied that was recovered by u.s. forces in northern iraq. in the wake of these arrests, dhs secretary janet napolitano and others have publicly acknowledged that security checks have been expanded to the more than 58,000 iraqi refugees who had already been settled in the united states. according to press reports this past february, intelligence indicates that the threat posed by refugees with ties to al qaeda is much broader than was previously believed. fbi director robert mueller stated la
kind of iraq did the united states leave behind after all the sacrifice, the american lives lost, the tens of thousands wounded, the billions of dollars expended. what was american policy toward iraq and what does iraq look like today said it is the question that i sought to address by in the up pretty much covered in the entire scope of the war since a lot of reporting on it. >> host: so a year on our december 2011 what have we achieved in a year on had we still achieved then? >> guest: well, why the time, by december of 2011, they're had been a number of elections in iraq, which is to the good, but iraq hadn't fully become a democracy in the sense that it hadn't been a peaceful transfer of power from the current regime led by maliki to another pamela starr. i think that is a true test of democracy is whether there isn't an election and russia has elections as i served there there's another candidate wins and power is handed over to that candidate. iraq hasn't set that milestone yet. so, what we had in december of 2011 was a relatively stable iraq, a lot of hopes, but i think un
to keep in mind where we have been and where we are going. we have 20 women in the united states senate. we have 80 men. there are only 16 democratic women in the senate, and four republican. we have a long, long ways to go. the united states of america was 77th in the world in the percentage of elected women to office. we cannot as an organization take on the whole problem. we believe that we need more women. our piece of the puzzle is to elect pro-choice democratic women. the democratic party is for the most part pro-choice. the vast majority of the women we work with are pro choice anyway. as the organization, when we started women were not running. part of what we do is not so much to choose them and make it happen, but we encourage women to step up and take this on. we need a lot more of that. we do not have enough women running for office in this country. host: why not the republican party? guest: it is not something that women think of doing right away. there is a study done by rutgers a couple of years ago that asks the question of all of these legislatures, women and men. how m
of a broader counterrevolutionary force led by the british, then the united states seem to recognize the soviets in 1933 under roosevelt. then during the '30s, the soviet union was pushing very hard for international consensus in trying to stop hitler. the anti-fascist forces globally and the commons party was -- as a result of that. but then during the war, after germany attacked the soviet union in 1941, then the united states and the british decide they will support the soviet union because, to bring the service can keep the soviets in the war. the soviets were caught so offguard that the british were concerned that the service would think -- capitulates at the moment. the united states offer several things. the soviets make several demands. the united states promises matÉriel and has a hard time living there for a number of reasons. in the first couple of years. stalin said if you give us the airplanes and other equipment that we need, the united states tries to roosevelt makes an effort. other people are not as quite sincere in providing. the soviets second and, they wanted som
the way back to a deal that john lewis and harry truman made in 1946. the united mine workers and i insisted on a new law that we called the coal act protecting 200,000 miners and their families today. we actually helped avert a nationwide coal strike in 1994. in that fight, and so many others, we have been proud to stand with the working men and women of america. steelworkers, teachers, nurses, and everyone deserves a fair wage and a safe place to work with a basic health care. [applause] our country cannot be as great as it should be unless our workers voices are heard and respected. not only by everybody in general, but certainly policymakers. i am just a single-minded about comprehensive health-care reform. i know is not particularly popular in west virginia, but it's ok. because of my fingerprints are all over it, i know is good and i know it will benefit west virginia more than any other state. it is so incredibly complex, not just the 17% of gdp has people like to say, but it is so complex and involved and interests of people, nuances that we just had to do something about it
>> i ask president obama to do the right thing. the united states must renounce its which hunt against wikileaks. the united states must dissolve its fbi investigation. >> as julian assange remains holed up in the ecuadorean embassy in london, we look at a new documentary called "we steal secrets: the story of wikileaks ." today, academy award winning filmmaker alex gibney, and jennifer robinson, legal counsel to assange. >> the laws cannot protect us. >> the new documentary examines how millions have died from aids because big pharmaceutical companies and the united states refused to allow developing nations to import life-saving generic drugs. we speak with the film's director and and a doctor, peter mugyenyi, who was arrested trying to import generic drugs into the gondola. -- uganda. this is democracy now!, democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. the obama administration has again delayed its decision on the keystone xl will pipeline, now saying it will not come before march. president obama initially sidestepped the issue in 2011 by putting it off unti
qaeda or its continued plotting against the united states and other countries. the preeminent security threat to the ad states remains al qaeda and its adherents. since september 11, the counter- terrorism effort has been aimed at preventing the counter terror -- the counter efforts of al qaeda on the homeland. al qaeda continues to edify operatives overseas and develop new methods overseas to attack us at home. affiliated movements have taken us beyond the core leadership in afghanistan and pakistan, including the middle east, and east africa, central asia, and southeast asia. although each group is unique, all aspire to advance al qaeda's agenda by stabilizing the companies in which they operate and attacking the u.s. and plotting to strike it u.s. homeland. in south asia, al qaeda continues to pose a threat from its base of operation in pakistan's tribal areas. in order to use that to carry a attacks against a homeland as well as our interests and those of our allies and partners in pakistan, afghanistan, india, and europe. the united states faces to counter terrorism charges -- a d
. if you listen to african american women talk about churches in the united states, you'll hear concerns. you will hear concerns from sisters in islam, a really wonderful group in malaysia talking how to reinterpret the koran so women's integrity is more full-fledged. so it's not really an answer to your question, but it does mean we have a much bigger agenda that if we take religion seriously is to watch a women engage with religion, both state and has organized process and what kind of gender analysis, what the gender analysis show you about the part is of a particular religion in particular places. i know from a serbian feminist friends that there is an enormous alarm now in the reassertion of the serbian orthodox christian church in serbian political life. there is also a lot of of armed amongst russian feminists about the closeness of the putin government to the russian orthodox church now. so you have to watch over time. you have to listen seriously to feminists in any country before you make a function. you have to be curious about how women live their religious lives or nonreligi
in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria. we v a series of feisty debates on the hot topics of the day. we start with president obama's nomination of senator chuck hagel to be the next secretary of defense. we have a clash you will want to watch. >>> then the relationship between the united states and russia keeps getting worse, whose fault is it? moscow or washington? a debate. also, the next fight in washington will be over the debt ceiling. can president obama end this craziness and bypass congress altogether? we'll talk about the out of the box solutions and whether they would work. >>> and, finally, this is the signature of the man who might be the next treasury secretary. we'll look back through history to see if there's any loopy president. speaking of secretaries of the treasury three former holders of the office and many other statesmen and women offering advice to the president on a new gps special tonight "memo to the president, road map for a second term." tonight at 8:00 p.m. and 11:00 p.m. eastern and pacific. >>> first, here's my take. chuck hagel's nomination
use or if they are dangerous and unusual weapons. that was a dichotomy set up by the united states supreme court. if they are in common use like handguns we have to go to the second step of the analysis. if they are dangerous and unusual weapons like machine gun, the analysis would stop there. assault weapons are pretty commonplace. they become popular and firearms in a gun rights community. there are apparently tens of millions of these firearms out there, arguably they are commonly used, but one argument is while they are common they are not commonly used for the core purpose of the second amendment, self-defense. they are poor self-defense weapons. it is hard to maneuver in the home, and projectiles are propelled of such a rate they are likely to pose dangers and who people as they go through walls, endangering family members or neighbors. if that is right, assault weapons would not be thought to be within the scope of the second amendment, and yet i should admit we talked extensively that there are some reasonable arguments you could make against an assault weapons ban. an assa
specific importance to the united states we understand, as was for us the issue of sovereignty and the tensions and the continued presence of international forces in afghan villages and the conduct of the war itself. with those issues resolved, as we did today, the rest was done earlier, i can go to the afghan people and argue for immunity for u.s. troops in afghanistan in a way that afghan sovereignty will not be compromised, in a way that afghan law will not be compromised, in a way that the provisions that we arrive at through our talks will give the united states the satisfaction of what it seeks, and will also provide the afghan people the benefit that they are seeking through this partnership and the subsequent agreement. [indiscernible] that is not for us to decide. it is an issue for the united states. numbers are not going to make a difference to the situation in afghanistan. it is the broader relationship that will make a difference to afghanistan and beyond in the region. the specifics of numbers are issues that the military will decide and afghanistan will have no p
created in your image, a unit of god's grace, unprecedented, a repeatable and irreplaceable. we play -- pray for your blessing. with out it we will see only what the eye can see. we will see that we're created in your image, whether brown, black, or white, male or female, first-generation immigrant american or daughter of the american revolution, gay or straight, rich or poor. we pray for your blessing. without it we will only see scarcity in the midst of abundance. with your blessing we will recognize the abundance of the gifts of this good land with which you have and out of this nation. we pray for your blessing. bless all of us. privilege to be a resident of this nation with a. of gratitude in humility that we may be a blessing. we pray that you will shower with your life giving spirit, that will be leaders of this land, especially barack our president and joe our vice-president. fill them with righteousness that they may serve this nation ably and be glad to do your will. endow their hearts with wisdom and forbearance so that peace may prevail with righteousness, and justice wit
terrorists and the stakes could not be higher. this comes from a united states military commander in the united states. i'll jump across the border and tell you why the stakes could not be higher. this is pakistan in 2005. 74,000 people were killed in this earthquake. 18,000 were kids going to school. most of the kids that died were younger and female because they didn't have desks so when the walls started shaking and the roof came down they perished. there was 9,000 schools destroyed or rendered unusable. 1/2 million kids displaced out of school. in earthquake, they call it the coy mot that means this apocalypse. at first there was a very heroic effort. infer natio international community helped. after katrina red cross got 2,000,000 for help and for this earthquake red cross received 6 million dollars. the united states sent in helicopters that conductd the greatest air lift in the history of mankind. moved about 20 thousand on thes in the mountains to keep 1/2 million people a hive during the wintertime. it was very heroic and people were grateful. aid has dropped 70 percent a
of its information, although the united states has had drones over that plant for much of the time. so at this hour this is what we do know, that the algerian government has concluded its operations against the terrorists that the incident is ending. some north african news outlets have claimed that at least 35 captives were killed in the algerian military rescue attacks the "wall street journal" is reporting algerian government sources putting the number of casualties to be ten or perhaps 11. this is what reuters news service is reporting. thirty hostages killed when the algerian forces stormed the plant. two of them japanese, to -- a french national. the nationalities of the rest as well as those who escaped remain unclear at this hour, and those rescued. fox news, however, confirms that at least two americans are among those who escaped and are on their way out of algeria heading to london. still, as many as seven americans are reportedly missing at this hour, as i said, all of this is very fluid, and many of these numbers are going to change as we learn more, hopefully far more dur
years ago, as we all know, we were considering lmj terminals to import natural gas to the united states. what a difference a few short years make. by developing new technology to access potential new sources like oil shale, which often goes not talked about, we will be able to dramatically increase our energy potential and role as the global energy leader. oil shale in the western united today is estimated at 800 billion barrels, which is nearly three times the proven oil reserve of saudi arabia. as the numbers clearly show, we in the industry are investing in america's future. and we'll be sharing what that means through a new campaign we are launching over the next few weeks, which will focus on raising understanding of the unique and foundational role of the u.s. oil and natural gas industry and what it means to our economy. what it means for our communities, and for o- america's lives, for revenue, for refining, and what it means ultimately to job creation and economic recovery. oil and natural gas companies support 9.2 million jobs and could easily support an additional 1.4 million
you around the world in 60 minutes. we begin with nuclear threats against the united states. north korea announced plans to test more nuclekes and more lon range rocket launches. north korea's defense commission calls america the sworn enemy of the korean people. i want to get straight to new york. >> the words are very threatening. it is very incredible to hear them directly threaten united states in that way just ahead of what they say will be another nuclear test. what i'm hearing and what analysts are saying is that is probably how one would have expected them to react. it comes just a day after yet more u.s. action and u.n. action at the security council and more sanction action. most people believe this is not a threat of attacking the united states but certainly the words are threatening to the united states. they say analysts that this is north korea's way of trying to deter any further action from the international community. and that they have no capacity to invade in terms of long range missiles to reach the u.s. it is a serious issue if they do test any kind of nuclear
is of very specific importance for the united states. as was for us the issue of sovereignty and detentions and the continued presence of international forces in afghan villages and the very conduct of the war itself. with those issues resolved, as we did today, part of it, the rest was done earlier, i can go to the afghan people and argue for immunity for u.s. troops in afghanistan in a way that afghan sovereignty will not be compromised, in a way that afghan law will not be compromised, in a way that the provisions that we arrive at through talks will give the united states the satisfaction of what it seeks and will also provide the afghan people the benefits that they are seeking through this partnership and the subsequent agreement. >> do you have any sense of how many troops you would be willing -- >> that's not for us to decide. it's issue for the united states. numbers are not going to make a difference to the situation in afghanistan. it's the broader relationship that will make a difference to afghanistan and beyond in the region. the specifics of numbers are issues the military wi
for congress extending the borrowing authority of the united states. >> will they roll it out. >> you can speculate about a lot of things, but there's not-- nothing needs to come to these kinds of, you know, speculative notion about how to deal with a problem easily resolved by congress doing its job. very simply, since treasury, i believe, overseas printing and minting, you might ask treasury. >> at no point in-- >> and joining me now the chairman of the south carolina democratic party and mark theeson, enterprise institute and former speech writer for george w. bush. if congress doesn't give him the authority to raise the debt limit, he has the end around it with the trillion dollar coin he could just sort of say is there and allows him to spend more because we have this extra savings to really boil it down. mark, your thoughts? >> this, this may be one of the stupidest ideas ever to come out of washington and that's saying something. it's not clear it's legal. edward moy, under bush and obama may say it's legal to print a trillion dollars platinum coin, it doesn't have a trillion dolla
by an unmanned u.s. plane. he was one of the top commanders. it was part of the tribal region where the united states has been targeting insurgent leaders. he has been killed with five others. we are joined from islamabad for more on who the man was. >> he was a senior commander from the south region who was active in carrying out attacks inside afghanistan. he made no secret of it. he was a respected member of the tribe. the tribe lives on both sides of the border. he offered a great help to the pakistani authorities when he took on the fallen fighters. he moved them from their territory and it enabled the pakistani military to go on a major offensive against another try. an important figure -- against another try and. tribe.her >> the strikes appear to be undermining efforts to come to a truce in the region. >> it was not just been thrown strike that killed him, but another strike that had not far away. there were two drones strikes. 10 people killed and four other people killed. a rescue is underway to see if there are any survivors. there have been questions about the thrones strikes. paki
force by the united states if we're going to protect afghanistan from falling? meaning, a central government falling, meaning a security force that's unable to secure the country. >> i think back to i re-read barbara tuckman's book. at one point a british leader asked a french leader how many troops they needed early in the war and the french leader said just one and i'll make sure he gets killed. the point he was making was commitment. i think it's less about how many american forces are there. it's actually even not important how many american dollars or technology is there. there's this intangible commitment, the idea that we are reliable. i like to describe it almost as a line of credit that a business has. they really don't want to draw on it, but having it knows that they can maintain the solvency of the business. the afghans are terrified right now. >> if we lose afghanistan, what do we really lose? people have made the point time and time again al qaeda as a threat is no longer in country, the taliban itself could be part of the government and as much as the united states
too much of obama he says because in the united states, we subscribe to the quote, unquote myth of the imperial presidency. other transformational democratic presidents such as fdr and lbj, rockman says, have substantial democratic majorities in both the senate and in the house to enact their landmark legislation. obama in contrast has had to work with a narrow democratic majority in the senate and with an opposition party, the republicans in control of the house for the two years since january 2011. well, what about ronald reagan? president of the united states two successful four-year terms. on the domestic front, he enacted a major economic recovery package followed by an overhaul of social security. and in his second term, reagan gained a major tax reform. on the defense front, republican president reagan again with the help of the rity presided over a major increase in the defense budget, congress presided over a major increase in the defense budget, the defe including straby millions of protesters here and abroad. also commander in chief reagan gained secret aid for freedo
city, defense secretary leon panetta announced the united states military will no longer ban women from serving on the front lines of war. and open up hundreds of thousands of fighting jobs for women service members. the decision reverses the 1994 rule that restricted women from combat roles, even though women frequently found themselves in direct combat in iran and in afghanistan. many fought and died there, in fact, those wars led to the deaths of 152 american service women. the defense secretary leon panetta today said that not everybody will become a combat soldier, but that everyone is entitled to a chance. >> i go on to bethesda to visit wounded warriors and i've gone to arlington to bury our dead, there is no distinction that's made between the sacrifices of men and women in uniform. they serve the wounded and they die right next to each other. >> shepard: the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff recommended the move and the bipartisan group of lawmakers says it supports the lifting of the ban, but critics say they do have some concerns, including the republican congressman and
. who gets privilege of becoming a citizen of the united states of america. that's a big deal. when we talk about that in the abstract, it's easy sometimes for the discussion to take on a feeling of us versus them. and when that happens, a lot of folks forget that most of us used to be them. [chuckles] >> we forget that [applause] it's really important foritous remember our history. unless you are one of the first americans, a native american, you came from someplace else. somebody brought you. [cheers and applause] you know, ken salazar, he's of mexican-american dissent, but his family's been living where he lives for 400 years. so he didn't immigrate anywhere. the irish, who left behind a land of famine, the germans who fled persecution, the scandinavians who arrived eager to pioneer out west, the polish, the russians, the italgian, the chinese, the japanese, the west indians, the huddled masses who came from ellis island on one coast and angel island on the other... [applause] all those folks, before they were us, they were them. and when each new wave of immigrants, they faced from
scattered around the hospital's different departments as well as in the intensive care units who have not been identified yet. it isn't a big number, the people waiting outside for news are desperate. >> it was the end of the summer holiday season in brazil. the last chance to party for many young people due back at school or work on monday. cnn, santa maria, brazil. >> we had a similar tragedy here in the u.s., a fire started at an overcrowded nightclub in rhode island and died. if you can believe it, that was 10 years ago. susan candiotti has a look back at that nightclub fire. >> reporter: in 2003, 100 people died at the station nightclub in west warwick rhode island, where the band great white was performing, pyrotechnics ignited sound proofing material, smoke filled the room, in 1990, arson was the cause of the happy land fire in new york, it killed 87 people. authorities said the bronx club was operating illegally, two years after it was ordered closed because of safety violations. in 1977 fire at the beverly hills supper club in south gate kentucky killed 165 people. among 2400
and the government is getting violent. the united states is getting involved. they're threatening to take control of the entire country. the militants' move prompted france to take action over the weekend. they put boots on the ground and went all in, bombing rebel training camps and other targets. so what will the united states do? a pentagon official told me this afternoon that the u.s. will participate in mali, but, and i want to make sure i put quotes around this, it's still deciding what that looks like. when we went to the mali border last summer, i saw first hand how dangerous the situation is. today, we spoke to some of our sources on the ground, including the military commander of the al qaeda's linked group. he told us that the militants are, in his words, excited and would welcome u.s. troops on the ground. he also said the french bombs have killed civilians and that france is signing a death warrant for french people around the world, opening the gates of hell. omar said the militants will fight to the end and this will be a long war, more dangerous than afghanistan or iraq. we also s
washington. your gracious favor and devine blessings upon these united states of america, our president, barack obama, and vice president joseph biden as a second term of their sacred responsibilities in the highest office of our country. bless, preserve, and keep them and their families safe and healthy together with all who serve our nation's, especially in the congress, the judiciary, and the armed forces, here and everywhere who heroically and sack -- sacrifice for the life of liberty and the pursuit of happiness. father, may we ever abide in this land of opportunity and freedom in perfect tranquility, faithful to our foundations and ever more prosperous, just e quitble society for all our citizens, and may we always share our faith and hope for the future with the whole world through your define and gracious love. amen. >> thank you. >> okay, please be seated for a moment. my pleasure, arch bishop. thank you. well, i think everyone would agree there's been a wonderful inaugust grail ceremony, a delicious lunch, and it's now time to head to the next happy stop, the presidential para
of the united states of america is not a bargaining chip. and they better choose quickly because time is running sht. >> rose: other topics included the ongoing debate on gun control, and the lack of diversity in the second term appoint ease. joining me from washington al hunt of bloomberg news and from the white house major garrett of cbs news. thank you. al better i start with you. characterize for me the president in temperment and in words on the bet dealin dealing -- ceiling. >> charlie, i think he realizes he has a winning hand substantively on this and there will be caveats in just a moment. i was truck,-- struck, however that what this really, his last press conference his first term showed he should have had a lot more than he did. because he's rusty. if was almost analogy can be made to that first debate. he went on too long for a while. he stepped on his narrative some. and if you read t i think reads better than it looked. the reason i say i think he believes he has the upper hand on the debt sealing is because republicans have a losing hand. they don't want to hold the full faith an
to vip members of congress and the official program which was a history, also has a history of the united states capitol inside plus the program of events, of course, on the public inauguration day, which is monday. you can see it right here. it's really, really quite beautiful. >> it's gold. gold glitters here. >> it's gold. >> the honor of your presence is requested at the ceremonies attending the inauguration of the president and vice president of the united states. >> the guy we were just talking about. he'll be here, you'll be here, i'll be here. >> tomorrow we'll be here, sunday we'll be here, monday lots of live coverage coming up. history unfolding and we're thrilled to be here. thanks very much for joining us. we'll see you back here tomorrow. read us as well. "erin burnett outfront" starts right now. >>> next, breaking news. cnn has learned an american has been killed during the hostage situation in algeria. plus the man who says he's behind the attack has the nickname "the marlboro man" and "the jihad prince." >>> the number of american husband holds with guns is on the decline
[cheers and applause] >> it is my distinct honor to present the chief justice of the united states, the honorable john roberts was administered the oath of office. everyone, please stand. >> are you prepared to take the oath, senator? >> i am. >> i, barack obama, do solemnly swear that i will execute the presidency of the united states and will to the best of my ability preserve, protect, and defend the constitution of the united states so help me god. >> congratulations, mr. president. [cheers and applause] [fanfare sounds] ♪ [playing "presidential march"] [cannons firing] [cheers and applause] >> it is my great honor to present the 44th president of these united states, barack obama. [cheers and applause] [crowd chanting "obama"] >> thank you. thank you. my fellow citizens, i stand here today humbled by the task before us, grateful for the trust you have bestowed, mindful of the sacrifices borne by our ancestors. i thank president bush for his service to our nation, as well as the generosity and cooperation he has shown throughout this transition. 44 americans have now taken th
to risk the full faith and credit of the united states for whatever agenda you have. the business community felt that. the public felt that. and so the fact that they have backed off both -- not only the idea that we should hold debt ceiling hostage, but second that it shouldn't be one for one cuts, you know, boehner used to say that, the house proposal doesn't say that, dollar in cutting for every dollar in raising the debt ceiling. >> would you support a short-term measure to force you to pass a budget? >> i think it should be longer because we don't want to play fiscal cliff every three months. but it's a positive step. >> you never get a clean debt ceiling raise. >> yes, you should. >> that's not a question of whether you should. but historically it's not been the case. >> mitch mcconnell proposed it two years ago and we passed it. but let me say this on the budget. we democrats have always intended to do a budget this year. for two reasons. first, it is not true that we haven't had budget control in effect over the last several years. the budget control act of 2011 put rigid
at the ceremonies attending the inauguration of the president and vice president of the united states. >> the guy we were just talking about. he'll be here, you'll be here, i'll be here. >> tomorrow we'll be here, sunday we'll be here, monday lots of live coverage coming up. history unfolding and we're thrilled to be here. thanks very much for joining us. we'll see you back here tomorrow. read us as well. "erin burnett outfront" starts right now. >>> next, breaking news. cnn has learned an american has been killed during the hostage situation in algeria. plus the man who says he's behind the attack has the nickname "the marlboro man" and "the jihad prince." >>> the number of american husband holds with guns is on the decline but the nra's power is growing. it is growing even after newtown. breaking news, one american has been killed in the algeria hostage situation. we'll tell you what we know about that man and the other americans we are aware of tonight. let's get straight to jill dougherty at the state department. first, jill, what can you tell us about the american who died? >> there are not a l
the military will let women serve in front line combat units, including infantry, artillery, even potentially special forces. >> our nation was built on the premise of the citizen soldier. and our democracy, i believe it is the responsibility of every citizen to protect the nation. >> the policy came together after more than a year's effort by secretary panetta and joint chiefs chairman martin dempsey with the heads of each service signing off. the branches will have until may to submit plans for integrating women and they'll also be able to make the case that certain specialties should not be open to women, special forces, for instance. early reaction was mixed. one said men and women side by side in combat would be distracting, harmful, and awkward for unit cohesion. >> combat is a very hard game. i think people are being awfully cavalier about this restriction being lifted. combat is a life or death game. if we get this wrong, the loser dies. >> republican senator james inhofe sounded alarm bells saying congress may have to put the brakes on the deal, and family research groups weighed in.
the united states of america! [cheers and applause] >> goodach, everyone. we just watched as president obama pushed his plan for immigration reform in las vegas. coming just one day after the senate beat him to the punch, announcing its bipartisan proposal. president obama making remarks in las vegas. the president called for granting a path to citizenship for the estimated 11 million people in the united states, currently illegally. he praised the senate's efforts in announcing an immigration proposal yesterday. that plan had a key provision, requiring tighter border security before any illegal immigrants could get citizenship. that was key to republican support. it also calls for beefing up border security and punishments for businesses that hire illegal immigrants. republicans say they will not sign off on any immigration reform that doesn't put border security first. let's go to carl cameron in washington. how do you break this down? is there a big difference from what you heard from president obama, compared to the bipartisan commission of eight senators yesterday? we heard a lot more f
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